Immigration Office, 2014 -

Immigration Office is a long term project by Lucas Odahara, Camila Riveros, Daniela Reina Tellez, Paula Hurtado Otero and Zhe Wang starting in April 2014. 

It's a space, but mainly a discussion. A platform ran by non-european artists who keep on producing art in Europe while their visa does not expire.


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Satelights Highlands 
Installation with ceramics, print on fabric, objects, projected text. 2015

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    Satelights Highlands 
    Installation with ceramics, print on fabric, objects, projected text. 2015

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    Satelights Highlands 
    Installation with ceramics, print on fabric, objects, projected text. 2015

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    Satelights Highlands 
    Installation with ceramics, print on fabric, objects, projected text. 2015

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    Satelights Highlands 
    Installation with ceramics, print on fabric, objects, projected text. 2015

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    Satelights Highlands 
    Installation with ceramics, print on fabric, objects, projected text. 2015

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    Satelights Highlands 
    Installation with ceramics, print on fabric, objects, projected text. 2015

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    Satelights Highlands 
    Installation with ceramics, print on fabric, objects, projected text. 2015

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    Satelights Highlands 
    Installation with ceramics, print on fabric, objects, projected text. 2015


Satelights Highlands
, 2015

Installation with ceramics, print on fabric. Variable dimensions

Photo: Installation at Dechanatstrasse Bremen 2015. © Lucas Odahara

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Satelights Highlands is an installation about mapping, or image making of distant topographies. It is based on NASA images of Titan (the moon of Saturn) and the idea of the dream of the explorer of reaching the unknown, that this collection of works were produced. A poem at the entrance of the room is projected, telling the story of the explorer. On the floor in the middle of the room is placed Titan’s Kraken Mare, handmade tiles in glazed ceramics. The slow process of bodily enacting on each tile of clay makes it the center piece of the show to which the other pieces stem from.

Among the works in the room there are images of the moon of Saturn digitally printed on fabric; an acrylic paint on canvas piece made from the direct print of the ceramics tiles, and next to it, on a table with a globe of the moon and a cachaça bottle lies a list of fictional places found on the map.

As a final piece on the big table, a map of the exhibition itself, with the works placed and named, as being, like the other works, also a room that has been temporarily conquered.

Lakes of Titan (Saturn's Story) 
Publication, 50 copies. 2015

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    Lakes of Titan (Saturn's Story) 
    Publication, 50 copies. 2015

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    Lakes of Titan (Saturn's Story) 
    Publication, 50 copies. 2015

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    Lakes of Titan (Saturn's Story) 
    Publication, 50 copies. 2015

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    Lakes of Titan (Saturn's Story) 
    Publication, 50 copies. 2015

Lakes oƒ Ttian (Saturn's Story) is a short story divided in a prologue and 3 acts.

The story is a conversation between Saturn and an artist who brings him to an image of Nasa in order to interrogate him about his presence as an immortal character in art history. During the conversation, Saturn tries to recite a poem that would explain his own story without depending on any artist to depict him. 

Titan's Magic Island 
Aluminium. 2014

Topography of Two (a love letter excerpt)
Inkjet print on paper, 2015

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    Topography of Two (a love letter excerpt)
    Inkjet print on paper, 2015

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    Topography of Two (a love letter excerpt)
    Inkjet print on paper, 2015

Topography of Two, 2015

Inkjet print on pink paper, reading

Photo: reading at GAK Bremen  © Lucas Odahara

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Topography of Two is a love letter found on the streets of São Paulo, translated by Lucas Odahara into English. The letter is printed in pink paper and was first read by Lucas at GAK Bremen in the occasion of a/topic magazine release. 

Fifteen Novels on Exactitude

Atlases, 2015

Fifteen Novels on Exactitude, 2015

Atlases. variable dimensions

Photo: Installation at Weserburg Museum für Moderne Kunst 2016. © Lucas Odahara

The Island of Vera Cruz
Installation with objects, unfired clay, ceramics, acrylic paint on fabric. 2015
Variable Dimensions

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    The Island of Vera Cruz
    Installation with objects, unfired clay, ceramics, acrylic paint on fabric. 2015
    Variable Dimensions

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    The Island of Vera Cruz
    Installation with objects, unfired clay, ceramics, acrylic paint on fabric. 2015
    Variable Dimensions

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    The Island of Vera Cruz
    Installation with objects, unfired clay, ceramics, acrylic paint on fabric. 2015
    Variable Dimensions

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    The Island of Vera Cruz
    Installation with objects, unfired clay, ceramics, acrylic paint on fabric. 2015
    Variable Dimensions

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    Cartografia
    ceramics, acrylic paint on fabric. 2015
    Variable Dimensions

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    Cartografia
    ceramics, acrylic paint on fabric. 2015
    Variable Dimensions

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    Cartografia
    ceramics, acrylic paint on fabric. 2015
    Variable Dimensions

The Island of Vera Cruz2015 

Installation with objects, unfired clay, acrylic paint on fabric, glazed ceramics. Variable Dimensions

Photo: Installation at Weserburg Museum für Moderne Kunst 2016. © Lucas Odahara

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In April of 1500, a Portuguese ship expedition took sight of Land after a long journey over the Atlantic. The chronicler Pêro Vaz de Caminha reports in a letter to the Portuguese king about the discovery and take over of the still unknown island. He calls it Ilha de Vera Cruz, the island of the true cross. But it soon becomes clear that it is a huge mass of land and in fact the expedition has landed in today's Brazil. The historical letter, written under false assumptions, creates a fascinating distorted portrait of South America, characterised by facts, courage, and self-willed interpretations.

The island, which only existed for a short time, is the starting point for Lucas Odahara's multi-part room installation. He combines historical documents with fictional writings and narratives, with which he refers to the objects in the exhibition space. These are reminders of a past life - furniture, a book shelf, self-made ceramic bowls - which can be interpreted in a variety of ways.

Odahara is aware of the fact that history is not something fixed, but is always recreated when looking back at it. The past is confirmed, rewritten or completely erased. In this sense he is also not interested in an authentic reenactment. He creates an artificial arrangement in which his personal access, his own version of Ilha de Vera Cruz remains visible. He thus presents the confrontation with history not as something finished in time, but as a necessary process of self-assurance. 

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Original text in German by Ingo Clauß

Rover (A New Balance)
Marble, 2014
120 x 90 x 25 cm

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    Rover (A New Balance)
    Marble, 2014
    120 x 90 x 25 cm

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    Rover (A New Balance)
    Marble, 2014
    120 x 90 x 25 cm

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    Rover (A New Balance)
    Marble, 2014
    120 x 90 x 25 cm

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    Rover (A New Balance)
    Marble, 2014
    120 x 90 x 25 cm


Rover (A New Balance)
, 2014

Marble. 120 x 90 x 25 cm

Photo: Installation at Künstlerhaus Bremen 2016. © Lucas Odahara

The palace was covered with ivy leaves
Marble, 2015
155 x 70 x 15 cm

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    The palace was covered with ivy leaves
    Marble, 2015
    155 x 70 x 15 cm

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    The palace was covered with ivy leaves
    Marble, 2015
    155 x 70 x 15 cm

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    The palace was covered with ivy leaves
    Marble, 2015
    155 x 70 x 15 cm


The palace was covered with ivy leaves
, 2015

Marble. 155 x 70 x 15 cm

Photo: Installation at Weserburg Museum für Moderne Kunst 2016. © Lucas Odahara

IMAGE 01 (Olaus Magnus, Carta Marina 16th Century)

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    IMAGE 01 (Olaus Magnus, Carta Marina 16th Century)

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    IMAGE 02 (Caspar David Friedrich, The Stages of Life)

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    GIF (Rosetta Stone)

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    IMAGE 03

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    IMAGE 04 (mapa das capitanias hereditárias)

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    IMAGE 05

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    IMAGE 06

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    IMAGE 07

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    IMAGE 08 (surface of Mars)

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    IMAGE 09 (photo from Rover on Mars)

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    IMAGE 10

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    IMAGE 11

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    IMAGE 12

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    IMAGE 13

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    IMAGE 14

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    IMAGE 15

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    IMAGE 21

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IMAGERY OF PLACES THAT NO ONE HAS EVER BEEN; BUT WE ARE ALL DYING TO CONQUER 
Lecture (transcription), 2015 

(Performed at the University of Arts of Bremen, January 2015)




Good evening. 

First of all excuse my use of the English language.

This is the reason why I’ve decided to share with you also my speech in written form. These words on the projection are my personal notes, a score to be followed by myself on my private screen. And for tonight I sort of wrote them on a fashion in which sounds maybe as if they were written spontaneously. I hope that it is slightly more entertaining. (cross arms)

I thought this was also a way we diminish the misunderstandings between my accent and our knowledge of this foreign common language. 

I’m talking tonight about a kind of image that triggers in me an amplified feeling of space and which I call it as 
Imagery of places that no one has ever been - but we are all dying to conquer. 

This kind of image for me is special because it’s made from far away, from the distance, and that distance is what allows desire and the will of conquering, the will of finding such a place, (pause) to come to life. 

I find that image sometimes as a place I inhabit when daydreaming, or a fantastic landscape described on a well written book, or on photoshopped images of a far away deserted holiday destination. Or even on images taken from satellites of landscapes on different planets. 

What all of them have in common is that they make me wonder if maybe that place actually exists, if they are pure fiction or reality. And if I could actually walk (hand gesture) on those lands. And when I start wondering that, I realize that I can host most of my mythologies, my fears and desires on this image of a place no one else has ever been but that I’m dying to conquer for myself.

**VIDEO

Take the idea for example of a deserted island, a spot on earth that no man has yet set their feet. 
It is there, where no one has ever been that we find a most precious dream, the dream of casting oneself away from whatever we have around us, of starting anew, of recreating everything from scratch. 
Such a place is also the proof that something exists outside our own existence, and that there lies the original, the pure. 

I was taught for example to believe that there are no unknown deserted islands on earth anymore. that every piece of the Earth is there, written on a map somewhere. That means that I would never find Andromeda chained to her rock, or Zeus hiding from his father Chronus, or Atlantis, or an eternal lover which can only exist on such a place. 

I feel like we are in times when human kind has been efficient enough over the last decades to make every corner of the earth visible (or at least that’s a feeling we’ve grown used to over the last decades). That we can find everyplace on a map, (pause - thinking) or that everyplace that is to be found is on a map. and that everyplace that is already on a map is already found. (smile)

Last year, for example, at the time of the disappearance of the malaysian airlines flight, I was very surprised with the terrifying feeling which most of the people around me had. And on how the news was talking about it as something unimaginable on the fact that an airplane could go missing somewhere on the ocean and no human being could tell exactly where. 

And I realized then that this common fear that spread around us was due to the fact that the myth of a completely and constantly over-watched (hand gesture) earth, was disrupted. I mean, If there was a huge plane completely missing somewhere on Earth, that means that there were places not being watched, or even maybe places no one has ever been. 

**IMAGE 01

After the Malaysian airlines mysterious disaster It was as if we were immediately brought again to a moment in time where blank zones on a map existed. Missing parts of a reality that happens without any of our presence as human kind. Like on this map here, (point to the map) the carta marina from the 16th century where Olaus Magnus draws the nordic countries and also all the sea monsters around. (gaze away) Because you see, this is what happens, when we are aware of the existence of this kind of place, that we know there is no human being around and it sort of has a life on its own, it’s there that mythology can grow wild. It is on those blank zones on a map, that we immediately start to project OUR sea monsters. OUR fears and desires. OUR fantastic theories of what may have happened to a missing plane. 

**IMAGE 02

And it is those blank zones on a map that make us navigate across unknown waters in order to find the images that we created. To caress the soul of the explorer within us and conquer these places. 

The amount of energy that we as human beings invest in reaching those places that no one has ever been before is incredible. 

**GIF
**IMAGE 03

The explorer is that who by playing with words, symbols and objects on top of a wooden desk creates places, new places that exist between the image that brought him to the new lands and the reality he found there. And it is a rewarding feeling the creation of the first images of the places that until then no one has ever been. (the following sentences slower now) To be the first to step on the stone. The first to set the flag. The first to name it. The first to build its images.

**IMAGE 04

I’m sure also that what I’m saying has something to do with the colonial past of my country of origin, and how we are the colonized and the colonizers at the same time. 
How I grew up filled with great stories of great navigation endeavors from my portuguese ancestors, and at the same time great stories of a greater time when my indigenous ancestors lived in a land without a map of itself, when all there was were blank zones.
And even on another instance, how my Japanese ancestors found their way through the ocean’s sea monsters in order to conquer a piece of the promised land to plant cotton. 

It’s haunted by the combination of all the hope and promises of a new land that no one has ever been, together with the nostalgia of an era where mythology could run free above an unmapped land that I prefer to look up beyond the foreseeable sky where satellites send images full of blank zones,

**IMAGES 5-20 (take your time, pass them slowly while speaking)

because there we can still find images of places no one has ever been but that we are all dying to conquer. Those machines that we release out on the cosmos gives us a glimpse of an untouched topography. Of an unsolved image. Of an open field.

This is where the curse of the explorer arises in me and I can’t help but producing images from this new land which may host my most precious mythologies. And I feel great pleasure in making myself present, in colonizing it, in naming these places, turning them into objects of their own representation, having their existence as pure images made by machines that still allows the romantic distance to exist.
These objects I make them fit inside a living room, a gallery, so I can then dream of inhabiting these images of places no one has ever been. And as cartography, I can finally feel their existence and borders, I can plan a conquest. 

I can play the role of the explorer, the colonizer, the white man on my own deserted territory, bringing to my wooden desk images and human projections, hoping that down here I can conquer them with words, sculptures and desires.

and create then new topographies, cartography of places no one has ever been but that I AM conquering.

**LAST IMAGE (21). pause. enlarge map. look at the map.

Reenacted Garden (1913)
Unfired clay, 2015
variable dimensions

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    Reenacted Garden (1913)
    Unfired clay, 2015
    variable dimensions

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    Reenacted Garden (1913)
    Unfired clay, 2015
    variable dimensions

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    Reenacted Garden (1913)
    Unfired clay, 2015
    variable dimensions

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    Reenacted Garden (1913)
    Unfired clay, 2015
    variable dimensions

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    Reenacted Garden (1913)
    Unfired clay, 2015
    variable dimensions

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    Reenacted Garden (1913)
    Unfired clay, 2015
    variable dimensions

Reenacted Garden (1913)2015 

Unfired Clay. Variable dimensions

Photo: Installation at Vila Auroroa Fundacion Botin, Santander Spain 2016. © Lucas Odahara

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Reenacted Garden (1913) is a series of negative forms in red clay of those same architectural ornaments from the building. Ornaments that presented natural themes, such as leaves and flowers from balustrade, pillars and tiles, exhibited in different parts of the house.

La Villa de Veraneo (excerpt)
Text on wall, 2015
226 x 156 cm each

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    La Villa de Veraneo (excerpt)
    Text on wall, 2015
    226 x 156 cm each

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    La Villa de Veraneo (excerpt)
    Text on wall, 2015
    226 x 156 cm each

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    La Villa de Veraneo (excerpt)
    Text on wall, 2015
    226 x 156 cm each

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    La Villa de Veraneo (excerpt)
    Text on wall, 2015
    226 x 156 cm each

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    La Villa de Veraneo (excerpt)
    Text on wall, 2015
    226 x 156 cm each

La Villa de Veraneo (excerpt)2015 

Text on wall. 226 x 156 cm each

Photo: Installation at Vila Auroroa Fundacion Botin, Santander Spain 2016. © Lucas Odahara

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La Villa de Veraneo and Reenacted Garden (1913) was produced and installed at Villa Iris in Santander, Spain (Fundación Botin). It is a story that takes place in different parts of the house. On the walls, printed on yellow patches, is an excerpt of the story about Elloy Martínez del Valle (the original architect of Villa Iris), who finds himself in 1914 on the day that the I World War erupted, one year after the construction of the Villa. The character walks around the building and wonders about the ornaments of the house and its motives based on nature, while being interrupted by thoughts on the war outside the Villa’s gates. 

 

Mapa Estórico
Tracing paper, marker, ceramics. 2015
120 x 100 cm

photo: Eike Harder

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    Mapa Estórico
    Tracing paper, marker, ceramics. 2015
    120 x 100 cm

    photo: Eike Harder

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    Mapa Estórico
    Tracing paper, marker, ceramics. 2015
    120 x 100 cm

    photo: Eike Harder

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    Mapa Estórico
    Tracing paper, marker, ceramics. 2015
    120 x 100 cm

    photo: Eike Harder

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    Fig. A

    C-Print. 2015
    40 x 60 cm

    photo: Eike Harder

Mapa Estórico2015 

Tracing paper, marker, ceramics. 120 x 100 cm

Photo: Installation at Kammer 2016. © Lucas Odahara

A Suitable Height for Highness (Chapter One), 2016 

Drawing on brass plate, wooden crate (made by Specht). 210 x 102 x 27 cm

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    A Suitable Height for Highness (Chapter One), 2016 

    Drawing on brass plate, wooden crate (made by Specht). 210 x 102 x 27 cm

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    A Suitable Height for Highness (Chapter One), 2016 

    Drawing on brass plate, wooden crate (made by Specht). 210 x 102 x 27 cm

A Suitable Height for Highness (Chapter one), 2016 

Drawing on brass plate, wooden crate. 210 x 102 x 27 cm

Photo: Installation at Städtische Galerie Bremen 2016. © Lucas Odahara

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A Suitable Height for Highness is an on-going series of works exploring verticality as a constant symbol of power, achievement and manhood, focusing on not only the eternal desire for height and power, but also on its limits, when we are reminded that structures of power, when translated into physical ones, are also bounded to structural limits and all its consequences. 

For A Suitable Height for Highness (Chapter One), firstly shown at the elevator of the Städtische Galerie Bremen, an art transport crate holds a brass plate telling the story of the first Imperial palm tree imported by the Portuguese royal family to Brazil. The tree, named as Palma Mater and planted by the King himself in the botanic garden in Rio, was established as symbol of nobility in the country. Achieving the height of 38,70m, the imported palm tree was higher than any other native Brazilian palm, and due to its height was destroyed by a lightning bolt – a common fate for their kind. 

All the other iterations of the work deal with the topic from different perspectives, such as A Suitable Height for Highness (Chapter Two), where a portuguese tile drawing found in a monastery in Salvador, Brazil depicting the Babel Tower is redraw on tiles and duplicated, connecting the towers of the drawings into one single higher one, with the writing 'Successful lovers' on it. Here, the catholic tale usually representing misunderstandings and mankind's greed is restaged by building the idea of love as an impossible structure between two scenarios of men planning to reach heaven. 

Retellings
inkjet print. 2016
21 x 29,7 cm

 

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    Retellings
    inkjet print. 2016
    21 x 29,7 cm

     

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    Retellings
    Mixed media. 2016
    165 x 60 cm

    photo: Stefan Törmer

Choreography for Time, 2016

Video. 14'10

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    Choreography for Time, 2016

    Video. 14'10

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    Choreography for Time, 2016

    Video. 14'10

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    Choreography for Time, 2016

    Video. 14'10

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    Choreography for Time, 2016

    Video. 14'10

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    Choreography for Time, 2016

    Video. 14'10

Choreographie für Zeit, 2016

Site specific installation, video, brick sculpture, book, acrylic paint on silk, drawing on paper. Variable dimensions

Photo: Installation at Haus Welpinghus September 2016. © Lucas Odahara

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Choreographie für Zeit (Choreography for Time) is a series of works developed for the attic of the Welpinghus' house. The house is located in the village of Borgholzhausen in Germany and was built in 1487, most of the time being owned by the family Welpinghus themselves.

The works are permanently installed at the attic, and depart from the story the Performance of Time. In the story, Time, as the main character, moves incessantly in the attic of the house when nobody is watching, in ways that the family living downstairs can hardly understand. With the story as a starting point, a series of works in different media were produced, from the construction of a brick wall in the attic built together with the inhabitants of Borgholzhausen (which is part of the video in the installation), to Scores for Time, where all the documents gathered by the family since 1792 are put together as music sheet. On each document of the book, the year is marked and a historical note is written on it. Notes that connect to Lucas Odahara's own history, spanning from south american historical anedoctes, to art history and gay culture.

Among the site specific works, time is portrayed as an inevitable connection between the specific attic of the Welpinghus family and other events worldwide – with works such as 'Kannst du die Revolution sehen? (Can you see the revolution?), a brass plate installed on the window with a view to the village. 

Partitur für Zeit, 2016

Book, music stand. 

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    Partitur für Zeit, 2016

    Book, music stand. 

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    Exhibition view - Choreography for Time. Haus Welpinghus, Borgholzhausen. 2016

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    Tempo (Kiyoco Odahara), 2016

    Calendar. 60 x 40 cm each

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    We were here, 2016

    Acrylic paint on fabric. 240 x 90 cm each

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    Exhibition view - Choreography for Time. Haus Welpinghus, Borgholzhausen. 2016

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    Choreography for Time (plan), 2016

    Drawing on paper. 150 x 70 cm

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    Wie Weit Kannst Du Sehen? (How far can you see?) , 2016


    brass plate, brass chain. 20 x 10cm

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    Exhibition view - Choreography for Time. Haus Welpinghus, Borgholzhausen. 2016

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    Lovers, 2016

    Marker on brass plate. 25 x 50 cm 

A Suitable Height for Highness (Chapter Two), 2016

Drawing on ceramic tiles, wood support. 200 x 115 cm

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    A Suitable Height for Highness (Chapter Two), 2016

    Drawing on ceramic tiles, wood support. 200 x 115 cm

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    A Suitable Height for Highness (Chapter Two), 2016

    Drawing on ceramic tiles, wood support. 200 x 115 cm

A Suitable Height for Highness (Chapter two)2016 

Drawing on ceramic tiles, wood support. 200 x 115 cm

Photo: Installation at Städtische Galerie Bremen 2016. © Lucas Odahara

A Suitable Height for Highness (Chapter Three), 2016
Ceramic tiles, brass plate, brass chain. 450 x 350cm

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    A Suitable Height for Highness (Chapter Three), 2016
    Ceramic tiles, brass plate, brass chain. 450 x 350cm

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    A Suitable Height for Highness (Chapter Three), 2016
    Ceramic tiles, brass plate, brass chain. 450 x 350cm

A Suitable Height for Highness (Chapter three)2016 

Ceramic tiles, brass plate, brass chain. 450 x 350cm

Photo: Installation at Städtische Galerie Bremen 2016. © Lucas Odahara

We Hope This Finds You Well, 2016

Book organized by the Immigration Office

with contributions by Seda Naiumad & Natascha Sadr Haghighian, Immigration OfficeChanna AmarathungaLetizia Calori & Violette Maillard, Fanny GonellaLucas OdaharaMeriç Algün Ringborg, Life Sport, Mona SchierenAntoine Cassar, Daniela Reina Téllez, Black Athena CollectiveYvonne Bialek, Rosa Barba, Paula Hurtado Otero & Daniel Meißner and Andrea Sick.

We Hope This Finds You Well, 2016

Book organized by the Immigration Office

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with contributions by Seda Naiumad & Natascha Sadr Haghighian, Immigration OfficeChanna AmarathungaLetizia Calori & Violette Maillard, Fanny GonellaLucas OdaharaMeriç Algün Ringborg, Life Sport, Mona SchierenAntoine Cassar, Daniela Reina Téllez, Black Athena CollectiveYvonne Bialek, Rosa Barba, Paula Hurtado Otero & Daniel Meißner and Andrea Sick.

Time Still, 2017

Acrylic paint on silk, Tape. 150 x 300 cm

Photo: Installation at Kestner Gesellschaft, Hannover 2016. © Lucas Odahara

Tempos Verbais (the Volume of History and the Balance of Time), 2017

Sound Installation, wood, acrylic paint on felt, acrylic marker on wall. 300 x 200 x 150 cm

Photo: Installation at Kestner Gesellschaft, Hannover 2016. © Lucas Odahara

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"It's either today, or not tomorrow!", announces the speaker to his bewildered audience. With passionate enthusiasm, he points out the deficiencies of the status quo and calls for a reorganization of things. His struggle turns into rhythmic sounds and chanted songs. They are student protests and marches against oppressive governments, which are part of a diverse sound collage played over two sound speakers placed on top of a black-and-white landscape through which roads are drawn. They offer us different definitions of the English "simple present" tense and represent the idea of ​​the progression of time and its grammatical translation within a language system. Lucas Odahara examines the specific state of time within revolutionary processes with "Tempos Verbais (the Volume of History and the Balance of Time)" and brings up the question of how the idea of time can be materialized in space. According to Walter Benjamin, the moment of the revolution possesses the ability to break up the continuum of history. When time describes the progress of the present from the past into the future, the outbreak of a revolution can expose this irreversible flow of time for a moment. During the act of protest, when a collective dissatisfaction is released, the present can be isolated from the past and the future, and an alternative historical path can be taken.

The sound installation is a joint project by Lucas Odahara and the designer and sound artist Pedro Oliveira. From their own sound recordings and found online footage the two artists create a continuously growing archive of protest songs. Excerpts from this archive are presented for the first time in the Kestnergesellschaft as part of an audiovisual installation. The sound work will never be complete, as worldwide protests take place and new material is continuously being added into the archive.

original text in German by Elmas Senol 

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